Track and Field

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Track and Field

Kabel Moore

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Track and Field qualifies as an individual and a team sport. Everybody on the team gets to compete in events, but depending how hard a person works determines how well they excel in their event and how far they go after the regular season ends. Each participate earns points for the team by placing high in their events; the team with the most points at the end of the meet wins.
All track events hold one critical aspect in common: technique. From throwing the discus to running the four-hundred, a person needs technique. For example, in the shot-put, a spectator might think a very strong, muscular guy wins every time over a smaller guy. However, if that muscular guy lacks technique while the smaller guy excels in technique, the smaller guy will most likely win.
A person may question joining the track team due to a misconception that track is too hard. However, while track may be hard, track is also very fun and enjoying. The people on the team and other teams make track practice and track meets enjoyable.
At Madison County High School, track starts in the winter and ends in the spring. Practices are everyday after school from 3:30 to 5:30 at the track beside the sports complex. Each year, many kids come out and participate throughout the season and then return the following year.
Anyone can participate in track; there proves to be an event for any shape or size; even a big man relays exist. A runner, jumper, hurdler, or thrower (literally anyone) may participate in track. Track may not seem like a social sport, but every meet presents the opportunity to talk to someone new, and most participants comes across as very nice and supportive.
Track teaches people life lessons like discipline, sacrifice, and how to overcome setbacks, and it also brings people together for the better, even if not everyone wins.